Difference between the pink cable and an usual RJ45 cable

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Arielis, Jan 23, 2012.

  1. Arielis

    Arielis

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    Hello,

    Is there a difference between the C-bus RJ45 pink cable and an usual one technically?

    Regards,
     
    Arielis, Jan 23, 2012
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  2. Arielis

    tobex

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    As far as I know ... thicker insulation and validation that you are in compliance with the system wiring requirements for warranty purposes.
     
    tobex, Jan 23, 2012
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  3. Arielis

    Arielis

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    Hum... so even if I have already some meters of RJ45 cable cat 5. I have to use the pink one to connect the system for warranty purposes.

    Thanks,
     
    Arielis, Jan 23, 2012
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  4. Arielis

    tobex

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    There is a clause in the support guidelines which indicate that if you wish to prove that a module is faulty you then also have to indicate how it is connected.

    Though, I have never seen clipsal force this issue. They do have a point. I have seen some wires in the past from other brands where it is very difficult to tell orange and brown apart and in some instances solid versus stripe.

    Those are all contributing factors to the possible reasons for why something doesnt work with other brands of cable.
     
    tobex, Jan 23, 2012
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  5. Arielis

    DarylMc

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    Hello Arielis
    Aside from any other reason the Pink cable gives you a visual indication of what the cable is and is a tiny expense in the scheme of things.
     
    DarylMc, Jan 23, 2012
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  6. Arielis

    ashleigh Moderator

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    The major difference is the sheath insulation rating.

    Normal Cat 5 is rated to 1 kV or 1.5 kV, which is NOT SUITABLE FOR USE IN AN ELECTRICAL SWITCHBOARD.

    Once you get out of the switchboard you can (just) get away with plain blue Cat5. Inside the switcbboard you need either 3750 V or 4000V insulation rating depending on which standard you want to believe this week. The normal blue Cat 5 does not cut it, and if you use it and get inspected you might fail.

    DO NOT use cheap cat 5 sourced from China. I have seen some claimed as Cat 5 where the wire inside is so thin that you can break if with bare hands by pulling gently on it. I have also seen some where there are no enough twists / inch so the common mode noise rejection is lousy. And I have seen some where I don't know what the conductor material is but it sure was not copper!

    I also made the mistake of installing that cheap crap in my own home for data networking (ha ha should have known better), and ended up pulling it all out and using quality (Clipsal) Cat 6.

    Summary points:

    1. If you pay peanuts you get monkeys.

    2. If you want decent data cable, use decent data cable.

    3. If you want C-Bus in an switchboard use Pink C-Bus cable (its cheaper than Cat 6 data cable and a bit more expensive than Cat 5 data cable).

    4. If you *must* use Cat 5 cable for C-Bus use it only outside a switchboard.

    5. Don't confuse your data cable and C-Bus cable. The pink colour helps tell which is what when you are groping around in a roof space.
     
    ashleigh, Jan 24, 2012
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  7. Arielis

    71monaro

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    I have found myself with most of a roll of orange dynalite cable. It is shielded and has thicker cores. Is this similaly rated and as a domestic instal could it be used?
     
    71monaro, Jan 25, 2012
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  8. Arielis

    Newman

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    It would all depend upon the specification for the cable. C-Bus has certain cabling requirements which the C-Bus version of Cat-5 fills quite nicely. If it's shielded and you earth the shield (at 1 point only!) then it should perform from a noise perspective. I would be concerned about the cable capacitance though. You'd also need to do some voltage drop calculations based on the length of the cable used.

    Not using the pink C-Bus cable can be a major pain for another installer who may work on the job at a later date and you almost certainly would never get the site certified with Clipsal. It's usually just a whole lot less hassle to just use the right stuff.
     
    Newman, Apr 30, 2012
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  9. Arielis

    tobex

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    How many people do you know that drive $90,000 (when new) cars on $80 rubber. Or allow the wife to drive the kids around in a very old car while the husband drives a new car. It is the same problem in every sector of the market.

    Quality is 90% below the surface. The 10% you see is just the finishing and from what I can tell, it's the bling or the visible part that seems to excite most people. Which is really a pity.

    For those same reasons people laughed at me for terminating with ferrules, for using clipsal surge diverters, for using CBUS - but they all come and study the work when I am not there. For example, the architect who called me an idiot now brings the classroom to the site.
     
    tobex, Apr 30, 2012
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